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Approaching Ottoman History. An Introduction to the Sources by Suraiya Faroqhi

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Suraiya Faroqhi’s scholarly contribution to the field of Ottoman history has been prodigious. Her latest book represents a summation of that scholarship, an introduction to the state-of-the-art in Ottoman history. In a compelling exploration of the ways that primary and secondary sources can be used to interpret history, the author reaches out to students and researchers in the field and in related disciplines to familiarise them with these documents. By considering both archival and narrative sources, she explains why they were prepared, encouraging her readers to adopt a critical approach to their findings, and disabusing them of the notion that everything recorded in official documents is necessarily true! While the book is essentially a guide to a complex discipline for those about to embark upon their research, the experienced Ottomanist will find much that is original and provocative in its sophisticated interpretation of the field. An innovative approach to history, educating students in the field of research through analysis of the techniques and an understanding of the sources.Faroqhi is one of the most important scholars in the field, and a Press author of long-standing. Book is accessibly written, styled and structured: student accessories include reading lists at the end of each chapter and a carefully chosen bibliography of appropriate sources.

“…an excellent choice for undergraduate classes in such subjects as cultural studies, historiography, and historical sociology. In any field of history, the appearance of such an innovative primer on method would be regarded as a signal pedagogical event. For Ottoman studies, suspended between philology and post-colonial theory, the production of a text of such charm, candor, and utility is nothing short of miraculous.” MESA Bulletin

Approaching Ottoman History. An Introduction to the Sources
by Suraiya Faroqhi
Paperback: 272 pages
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (May 31, 2006)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0521666481
ISBN-13: 978-0521666480

Photograph/ Text © Cambridge University Press. JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes.The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption. JOC has made every reasonable effort to locate, contact and acknowledge copyright owners and wishes to be informed by any copyright owners who are not properly identified and acknowledged on this website so that we may make any necessary corrections.

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Written by calligrapher

April 22, 2007 at 12:08 pm

Posted in Book Reviews

Mosques of Istanbul

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The mosques of Istanbul represent the splendour of Islamic architecture. Their central domes, rising above the skyline of the city, convey both the ideals and ambitions of powerful Ottoman Sultans and the brilliance of the architects who created them. This book places these buildings in their historical, religious and social context. It traces the evolution of the Ottoman mosque from small, fourteenth century examples in the first Ottoman capitals, Bursa and Edirne, to those built after the capture of Constantinople in 1453, and to the vast centralised structures commissioned by Suleyman the Magnificent in the sixteenth century. The daring experiments in space, light and structure, by Michelangeloís Ottoman contemporary Mimar Sinan make a high point of the book, but the innovations of the Baroque and Neoclassical eras which follow are also fascinating. The author shows how these buildings are set in complexes of social and educational buildings that form the nuclei of neighbourhoods. He also offers. an insight into Ottoman life and the patronage of the sultans and viziers as well as powerful women of the court. With full colour illustrations and a lively, informative text, Mosques of Istanbul is indispensable, both to the visitor and to those wishing to understand Ottoman architecture. The book concludes with maps and itineraries in Istanbul, Bursa and Edirne that lead visitors through carefully planned sequences of mosques by easy and convenient routes.

Mosques of Istanbul by Henry Matthews
Publisher: Scala Publishers (April 15, 2007)
Pub Date: 2007
Edition: 238 x 167 mm ; softcover
Extent: 160 pages
Illustrations: 115 colour, 28 b/w
ISBN: 978 1 85759 307 5
Price: £14.95 / $29.95

Text/Photograph © http://www.scalapublishers.com/index.php

JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes.The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption.

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April 21, 2007 at 7:30 am

Posted in Book Reviews

Islamic Art Collections: An International Survey

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This text, an index of Islamic art collections in museums, libraries and other institutions, and in private hands, includes a short description of each collection, its main characteristics, documentation, publications and exhibitions. It provides useful administrative data for researchers, students, scholars and amateurs of Islamic art to know about existing collections and what they hold.

‘This is an excellent project and it has been carried out with exemplary care and accuracy. This survey, the first of its kind gives chapter and verse for the holdings of most of the major public collections of Islamic art in the Western world, and some of those in the Islamic world too. The usefulness of these details is self-evident. This is a first attempt at plugging a major information gap in the field of Islamic art.’ – Bulletin of SOAS

Karin Adahl, Islamic Art Collections: An International Survey
ISBN: 9780700711536
ISBN-10: 0700711538
Publisher: Routledge
Publication Date: 15/02/2000
Pages: 184
Trim Size: 246X189

Text/Photograph ©http://www.routledge.com/

JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes.The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption.

Written by calligrapher

April 21, 2007 at 6:23 am

Posted in Book Reviews

Recommend Reading: Paper Before Print

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Jonathan Bloom, Paper Before Print. The History and Impact of Paper in the Islamic World
Nov 19, 2001
320 p., 8 1/4 x 10 1/2
53 b/w + 48 color illus.
ISBN: 9780300089554

Like the printing press, typewriter, and computer, paper has been a crucial agent for the dissemination of information. This engaging book presents an important new chapter in paper’s history: how its use in Islamic lands during the Middle Ages influenced almost every aspect of medieval life. Focusing on the spread of paper from the early eighth century, when Muslims in West Asia acquired Chinese knowledge of paper and papermaking, to five centuries later, when they transmitted this knowledge to Christians in Spain and Sicily, the book reveals how paper utterly transformed the passing of knowledge and served as a bridge between cultures.

Jonathan Bloom traces the earliest history of paper—how it was invented in China over 2,000 years ago, how it entered the Islamic lands of West Asia and North Africa, and how it spread to northern Europe. He explores the impact of paper on the development of writing, books, mathematics, music, art, architecture, and even cooking. And he discusses why Europe was so quick to adopt paper from the Islamic lands and why the Islamic lands were so slow to accept printing in return. Together the beautifully written text and delightful illustrations (of papermaking techniques and the many uses to which paper was put) give new luster and importance to a now-humble material.

Jonathan M. Bloom, Norma Jean Calderwood University Professor of Islamic and Asian Art at Boston College, is coauthor of The Art and Architecture of Islam, also published by Yale University Press.

Reviews

“A very ambitious book of wide intellectual scope and down-to-earth relevance to the humanities—not just to the study of Islamic culture. It is brimful of ideas and fizzes with life.”—Robert Hillenbrand, University of Edinburgh

“A learned, rich, readable, and provocative work.”—Choice

“A fascinating cultural and historical examination that is beautifully complemented by detailed reproductions of maps and manuscripts.”—Christies (Website)

“Jonathan Bloom traces the history of paper and explores the impact of paper on the development of writing, books, mathematics, music, art, architecture and even cooking, and he discusses why Europe was so quick to adopt paper from the Islamic lands and why the Islamic lands were slow to accept printing in return.”—Discourse

“A refreshing history. . . . Bloom offers a compelling perspective of the humble and indispensable contributions of Islamic culture to Western society.”—Jake Benson, Hand Papermaking

“Paper Before Print is a sumptuous book, beautifully illustrated, lucidly written, and meticulously researched: its bibliography runs to thirteen pages.”—Guy Davenport, Harper’s Magazine

“By taking a technological perspective, Bloom has added greatly to our understanding of how medieval Islamic civilization was so successful, shone so brightly, and was able to advance along a broad front. The outcome is a fine piece of scholarship, the influence of which should be felt for many years. Yale University Press is to be congratulated, too, for matching this achievement with a well-produced and well-illustrated book that greatly enhances the argument.”—Francis Robinson, Isis

“This book is a comprehensive and analytical view of everything involving paper, including the origins of papermaking and its spread from China to the rest of Afro-Eurasia. The main emphasis, however, is the effect of paper on the medieval Islamic world. . . . The book is lavishly illustrated with hundreds of samples of parchment, papyrus, and paper. The technical information makes the otherwise abstruse production of papyrus, parchment, felt, paper, and molds easier for a non-expert to understand.”—Farid overshadowed, Journal of Interdisciplinary History

“This luxuriously produced and most satisfying history ought to be bought by every self-respecting library and by every lover of books.”—Hazhir Teimourian, Literary Review

“Bloom explores paper’s early evolution and use. . . . Accompanying Bloom’s elegant prose are 48 color plates and 53 b&w illustrations—of maps, illustrated texts of Islamic poetry, pages of the Koran and papermaking techniques.”—Publishers Weekly

“Bloom gives the reader ample reason for a change of mind about the importance of this apparently humble product of human ingenuity. . . . Bloom writes very engagingly, with the odd crinkle of wry wit, drawing together an immense range of materials. . . . This is a beautifully designed and executed volume. . . . Bloom has made a first rate contribution that pays fitting homage to the unpretentious nobility of its subject.”—John Renard, Religion and the Arts

“Paper Before Print asks students of cultural geography to consider the interaction between industry and art. . . . In a history of paper, we are asked to think about traditional art forms and ‘visual literacy,’ communication and calculation, innovation and circulation. These ideas proved, as does paper, the background for an erudite study of Islamic culture that offers readers a chance to question the mechanism of change and explore the impact of an invention ‘overshaadowed’ by its most powerful offspring, printing.”—Christopher Pastore, Sixteenth Century Journal

“Bloom’s book takes a major step forward in paper studies, venturing well beyond technical and production history into the cultural, social, and economic consequences of that history.”—Marianna Shreve Simpson, Speculum

“This is a book of uncommon quality, both in thought and in production. It will equally inform the historian of technology, the Islamicist, and the art historian. . . . It should be recognized as a major contribution to the world history of technology in general. Hats off the Jonathan Bloom.”—Richard W. Bulliet, Technology & Culture

“[Paper before Print] provides a highly readable introduction to a millennium of the civilisation that has enriched half the world.”—Peter Daniels, Times Higher Education Supplement

“Jonathan Bloom writes with an elegant lightness of touch and his arguments, by and large, convince. Paper before Print is beautifully illustrated and produced, a tribute to the art of paper-making in its own right. . . . This book will surely become fundamental to the discussion of Islamic art and literary culture.”—Hugh Kennedy, Times Literary Supplement

Text/Photograph ©http://yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/book.asp?isbn=9780300089554

JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes.The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption.

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April 21, 2007 at 5:36 am

Posted in Book Reviews

Notable Readings: Açıklamalı Hüsn-i Hat Bibliyografyası Yazmalar – Kitaplar – Makaleler Kitaplarda Hatla İlgili Bölümler Dış Ülkelerdeki Yayınlar

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Açıklamalı Hüsn-i Hat Bibliyografyası Yazmalar – Kitaplar – Makaleler Kitaplarda Hatla İlgili Bölümler Dış Ülkelerdeki Yayınlar, Ali Haydar Bayat(Editor); Foreword by: Ekmeleddin İhsanoglu,IRCICA Yayınları (Publications); İstanbul, 2002, 14 x 20 cm., xxxıv+416 p. Turkish,ISBN 929063126

This book gives a comprehensive bibliography of manuscripts, books, articles, the parts of books related to calligraphy as well as publications that appeared on calligraphy abroad. In the foreword, Prof. Dr. Ekmeleddin İhsanoğlu underlines the importance of this art for the Islamic world and the characteristics that make it unique among other arts. He then dwells on various activities of IRCICA in the field of calligraphy since its establishment 1980, in the form of research, publications, training programs, competitions and exhibitions. He points out that the bibliographic studies of the literature on calligraphy are a major part of the studies in this field. The book also includes a brief preface by Ali Haydar Bayat and an introduction by Prof. M. Uğur Derman. The present bibliography is the revised and enlarged version of the first edition covering the years of 1888-1988 and published in 1990.

This bibliography is organized in the following way: Part I gives information on the manuscripts located in the libraries in Turkey and related to calligraphy. Part II brings together the printed works in Arab and Latin characters. Part III presents the list of books and articles, newspapers and sections on calligraphy and their subjects [….] were added at the end of the bibliographic heading. Part IV brings together the catalogues of auctions covering the subjects of calligraphy, calligraphers and materials of calligraphy. Part V brings together the works on calligraphy written outside of Turkey. Part VI presents those articles that were published outside of Turkey and that were available to the author. Part VII includes the necessary addresses for reaching the studies on calligraphy through the Internet. Part VII also contains the indices of authors, calligraphers, books and periodicals covering the articles on calligraphy, different styles and materials of calligraphy. This reference book appears as the most voluminous one of the bibliographies that were compiled till the present day since it covers almost the entire literature in Turkey on this subject.

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April 13, 2007 at 9:23 pm

Posted in Book Reviews

THE ART OF CALLIGRAPHY IN ISLAMIC HERITAGE

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THE ART OF CALLIGRAPHY IN ISLAMIC HERITAGE

prepared by Uğur Derman,
edited with foreword by Ekmeleddin İhsanoğlu,
historical overview with the contributions of Nihat M. Çetin,
translated into Arabic by Salih Sadawi Salih translated into English by Mohamed Zakariya, Mohamed Asfour.

This album gives the history of the Islamic art of calligraphy starting from the development of the Arabic script through the last great artists of the Ottoman school of calligraphy. It is printed on high quality paper and contains 192 colour plates of calligraphy by Muslim artists from the first century Hijra to the present time with annotations about the style of writing and other characteristics of the work and the biography of each calligrapher.

Arabic Edition: FANN AL-KHATT, Istanbul, 1990
236 pages, 192 colour plates, 41×32 cm
Price: US$ 150 including post
ISBN 92-9063-520-7

Turkish Edition: HAT SANATI, Istanbul, 1992
244 pages, 192 colour plates, 41×32 cm
Price: US$ 150, including post
ISBN 92-9063-521-5

English Edition: THE ART OF CALLIGRAPHY IN THE ISLAMIC HERITAGE, Istanbul, 1998
192 colour plates, 41 x32 cm
Price: US$ 195, including post
ISBN 92-9063-074-4

Japanese Edition, Published by Heibonsha Limited

Malay Edition: SENI KHAT, Translated by Romzi Omar and Fauzi Mustafa. Published by Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka and IRCICA, Kuala Lumpur, 2000, Malaysia

© http://www3.ircica.org/kategoriler.php?grup=PUBLICATIONS

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April 6, 2007 at 5:15 pm

Posted in Book Reviews

Turkish Calligraphy at 700 Years

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M. Şinasi Acar, Türk Hat Sanatı-Araç, Gereç ve Formlar, Istanbul, p. 305 , ISBN 975-7843-03-2

In “Turk Hat Sanati – Arac Gerec ve Formlar” (Turkish Calligraphy — Tools, Materials and Forms), M. Sinasi Acar introduces readers to the masters and forms of calligraphy as well as its tools.

Although the Turkish Republic uses the Latin alphabet today, artists who were involved in calligraphy are remembered as the most successful calligraphers in the entire world. The success of Turkish calligraphers continues even today as the names of such artists fill the top ranks of calligraphers worldwide.

This new book supports books that have been published in the past on the topic of calligraphy using Arabic letters. The book is made up of three sections. The first section covers paper finishing, reed pens, ink-making formulas, inkstands, sharpening instruments, types of pen sharpeners, pen cases and scissors. The second introduces the forms and shapes in which calligraphy is employed — the Koran, pieces of poetry, collages of writing, framed inscriptions, descriptions of the Prophet and Muslim prayer books. The third section contains examples of other places where calligraphy is to be seen.

Author Turgay Artam says: “When one has to say something about Ottoman art — leaving aside architecture — the most important branch of art is that of Husn-u Hat [calligraphy]. One could say that the art form became so significant that it was considered holy primarily because of the Koran, and this was the reason that particular attention was paid to every instrument which assisted in the writing. The various parts of the process from pen to paper, from pen sharpener to bindings to the paper used in writing have seen great interest in today’s auctions.”

Text © Turkish Daily News. http://www.turkishdailynews.com.tr/archives.php?id=12838

Written by calligrapher

March 28, 2007 at 5:20 am

Posted in Book Reviews