Journal of Ottoman Calligraphy

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Archive for the ‘Biographies of Calligraphers’ Category

Hasan Temiztürk (b Sivas, 12 May 1959)

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(b. Taslihüyük/Sivas, Turkey 12.May 1959) Turkish calligrapher. He lives and works since 1969 in Germany. His line is a combination of classical- and experimental-modern style. Temiztürks works of art are contemporary, unique, spectacular and on unusual materials.Very new compositions are never seen before. As an peaceworker he describes himself as a mediator between the cultures and religions. Work for art and culture exchange, better understanding and living in peace together in our small transitory world. Hasan Temiztürk is one of the world most collected islamic calligraphic artists. In more than 100 Mosques in Germany his works are exhibited. His works can be found in many private collections like, Collection of Crown Prince of Dubai H.H. Shaikh Muhammed Rashed Al Maktoum, Finance Min. of UAE Dr. Muhammed Khalfan Bin Karbash, Shayka Hussah Al Sabah- Kuwait, HM.Sultan Bin Mohamed Al Qasimi, Sharja, HM. Haji Sultan Hasanal Bolkiah Brunei HM.Queen Elisabeth II, PM Tony Blair, London Mayor K. Livingstone, Ex. Turkish President Süleyman Demirel, Annemarie Schimmel, Dow Jones: Rushdi Siddique,Turkish National Library Ankara,Calligraphic Museum Istanbul.

Exhibitions and Workshops

1989 Nour Mosque, Karlsruhe, Germany
1990 Central Library Duisburg, Germany
1991 Barockhäuser, Würzburg, Germany
1992 Historic City Hall, Hanau, Germany
1993 Academie Plast Kunsten, Genk, Belgium
1994 Pfälz. State Library, Speyer, Germany
1995 Museum Verkehr-Technik, Berlin, Germany- Meeting of world calligraphers
1996 State Parliament Schleswig Holstein Kiel, Germany
1997 Klingspor Museum, Offenbach, Germany
Official invitation by President of Republic of Turkey Süleyman Demirel, Ankara, Turkey
1998 Official invit. German catholics church meeting as 1. muslim artist, Mainz, Germany
1999 Invitation to Heimatmuseum Berlin, Germany
2000 Invitation to Opendeuwekk Antwerp-Belgium
2000 City Library Worms, Germany
2001 „MS Marksburg“(Ship) Mannheim, Germany
2001 Official invitation German protestant church meeting as 1. muslim artist Frankfurt
2003 Forum Lohberg Dinslaken
2004 International Finance Forum Dubai- U.A.E
Gutenberg Museum, Mainz, Germany
University of Heilbronn, Germany
Lecture “Islamic Art History” and workshop”Arabic Calligraphy”, Heilbronn, Germany
2006 State Parlament Rheinland. Pfz. Mainz, Germany
1.Islamic, Christian, Jewish and Budism Interfaith Exhibition.
2007 University of Frankfurt, Germany
Lecture “Islamic Art History” and workshop “Arabic Calligraphy” Frankfurt, Germany

Contact

Hasan Temiztürk
Hohestrasse 10
D-63069 Offenbach/M., Germany
Phone + 49-(0)176- 240 690 02
email: htemiztuerk@aol.com
www.fuen-ul-islam.de

Get direction: Location Map

Photography/ Text © by artist Hasan Temiztürk.

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May 7, 2007 at 9:42 pm

Hafiz Osman (b Istanbul, 1642; d Istanbul, 1698)

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(b Istanbul, 1642; d Istanbul, 1698)Ottoman calligrapher. Son of a muezzin at the Haseki Sultan Mosque, he memorized the Koran at an early age and became known as Hafiz (Arab.: ‘he who knows the Koran by heart’). The Ottoman grand vizier Mustafa Pasha encouraged him to study with the Dervish ‛Ali Mustafa al-Ayyubi (d 1668) and then with Nafaszada Sayyid Ismail Efendi. Hafiz Osman attained his degree at the age of 18 and spent most of his life teaching and writing. His pupils ranged from the Sultans Mustafa II (reg 1695–1703) and Sultan Ahmad III (reg 1703–30) to poor students for whom he set aside one day a week. Considered the second most important Ottoman calligrapher after Seyh Hamdullah, Hafiz Osman evolved a simple, pure style of naskh based on that of Yaqut al-musta‛simi and Seyh Hamdullah. This style became the model for later calligraphers such as Mustafa Raqim Efendi, Mahmud Cemaledin Efendi (d 1829) and Mustafa Izzet Efendi. Hafiz Osman was also responsible for the development of dīvānī jalī, an ornamental script used in the chancelleries for official documents. In addition to transcribing many copies of the Koran (e.g. Istanbul, U. Lib., A. 6549), single pieces and albums of exercises, he was one of the first to pen large calligraphic descriptions of the Prophet Muhammad (Arab. hilya; e.g. 1691; Dublin, Chester Beatty Lib., MS. 2). He was paralysed three years before his death and was buried in the Koca Mustafa Pasha cementery.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
D. James: Islamic Masterpieces of the Chester Beatty Library (London, 1981), no. 40
H. Lowry: ‘Calligraphy: Hüsn-i hat’, Tulips, Arabesques & Turbans: Decorative Arts from the Ottoman Empire, ed. Y. Petsopoulos (London, 1982), p. 173; no. 174
The Anatolian Civilisations III: Seljuk/Ottoman (exh. cat., 18th Council of Europe exh.; Istanbul, 1983), no. E.309

Photography/ Text © HAT SAN’ATI Tarihçe, Malzeme ve Örnekler, Istanbul. http://ismek.ibb.gov.tr/portal/yayinlarimiz.asp Text: http://www.groveart.com

JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes. The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption. JOC has made every reasonable effort to locate and acknowledge copyright owners and wishes to be informed by any copyright owners who are not properly identified and acknowledged on this website so that we may make any necessary corrections.

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May 7, 2007 at 5:29 pm

Necmeddin Okyay Efendi [Efendi, Necmeddin; Üsküdari (b Istanbul, 29 Jan 1883; d Istanbul, 5 Jan 1976) ]

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(b Istanbul, 29 Jan 1883; d Istanbul, 5 Jan 1976). Turkish calligrapher. He attended the Ravzai Terakki school, where he received lessons in calligraphy from Mehmed Şevki and from Hasan Talat Bey. In 1905 he received permission to write in the ta’lıq style from Sami Efendi (1838–1912) and in 1906 received permission for the thuluth and naskh styles from Bakkal Arif Efendi. Later, at the School of Calligraphers, he learnt to draw tughras and practised jali-thuluth (Turk. celi-sülüs) with Ismail Hakkı Altınbezer (1870–1946). He also learnt from Shaykh Ethem Efendi the art of marbled paper, at which he became very skilful. His use of the surname Okyay came from his proficiency at archery. He succeeded his father as preacher and Imam at the Yenicami mosque at Üsküdar in Istanbul, where he remained for 40 years. He taught at the School of Calligraphers, the Oriental Decorative Arts School and finally at the Academy of Fine Arts in Istanbul, where he practised the ta’lıq style with his pupils. In addition to writing, he explored many crafts and skills related to calligraphy. From Baha Efendi he learnt the art of Turkish classical bookbinding and made fine sunburst bindings, and in turn trained Emin Barın (b 1913) and Islam Seçen in this art. He also learnt how to polish paper, developed formulae for preparing different varieties of ink and was skilled at identifying unsigned works of calligraphy. Among his pupils was the calligrapher Ali Alparslan (b 1925).

BIBLIOGRAPHY
S. Rado, ed.: Türk hattatlari [Turkish calligraphers] (Istanbul, n.d.), p. 265 [Turk. text]
M. Ülker: The Art of Turkish Calligraphy from the Beginning up to Present (n.p., 1987), p. 89 [Eng. and Turk. texts]

Photography © Gallery of Portakal Sanat ve Kültür Evi, Istanbul. Text: Grove Art Online

JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes. The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption. JOC has made every reasonable effort to locate and acknowledge copyright owners and wishes to be informed by any copyright owners who are not properly identified and acknowledged on this website so that we may make any necessary corrections.

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May 7, 2007 at 5:20 pm

Mehmed Şefik [Şefik Bey; (b Istanbul, 1819; d Istanbul, 1880) ]

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(b Istanbul, 1819; d Istanbul, 1880). Ottoman calligrapher. He first studied calligraphy with Ali Vasfi and then with Mustafa Izzet. In 1845 he was appointed teacher of calligraphy to the Muzika-i Hümayun, the imperial brass band. Together with the calligrapher Abdülfettah (1814–96), he was sent by Sultan Abdülmecid (reg 1839–61) to Bursa to repair the inscriptions in the Ulu Cami (congregational mosque), which had been severely damaged in the earthquake of 1855. His inscriptions there are reckoned among his finest works. During the three years he spent on this project he also wrote inscriptions in other mosques. His work includes beautiful compositions in thuluth, jalī, naskh and dīvānī scripts.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

K. Baykal: Bursa’da Ulu Câmi [The Ulu Cami of Bursa] (Istanbul, 1950)
A. S. Ünver: Hattat Şefik Bey (1819–1880): Hayatı ve eserleri [The calligrapher Şefik Bey (1819–1880): his life and works] (Istanbul, 1956)
Ş.Rado: Türk hattatları [Turkish calligraphers] (Istanbul, n.d.), pp. 220–21

Photography © Gallery of Portakal Sanat ve Kültür Evi, Istanbul. Text http://www.groveart.com

JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes. The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption. JOC has made every reasonable effort to locate and acknowledge copyright owners and wishes to be informed by any copyright owners who are not properly identified and acknowledged on this website so that we may make any necessary corrections.

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May 7, 2007 at 5:11 pm

Osman Özcay (b.1963)

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Calligrapher Osman Özçay, younger brother of calligrapher Mehmed Özcay, was born in Çaykara, in the province of Trabzon in 1963. He attended the same school as his brother Mehmet in Gerede and finished high-school there. After studying at the Islamic Institute in Erzurum for two years, he transferred to the Islamic Studies Department of Marmara University in Istanbul. He graduated in 1986.

In 1982, even though he did not have a special interest in Islamic calligraphy, he joined his brother when he first visited calligrapher Fuat Başar. He was suddenly attracted to the art and he started lessons in the script Thuluth the same day. He later received his diploma in the scripts of thuluth and naskh from his teacher.

When he came to Istanbul, he met M.Uğur Derman from whom he has benefited greatly throughout the years. Mr. Derman gave him some copies of Sami Efendi`s Jali Thuluth writings which were written for a public water fountain behind `Yeni Cami` (New Mosque) in Istanbul. These sources served as the most important guide in learning the script of Jali Thuluth.

In the first (1986) and second (1989) international competitions organized by The Research Centre for Islamic History, Art and Culture (IRCICA) which serves as the secretaryship of The Commission for the Preservation of Islamic Cultural Heritage associated with the Organisation of the Islamic Conference, he received five awards, gaining second and third prizes in various scripts including Jali Thuluth and Thuluth. He won the first prize at the calligraphy competition organized by the Maktab al-Shahid Kuwaiti institute in 1997.

Osman Özçay has participated in personal exhibitions with his brother Mehmet Özçay in Istanbul (1996), Abu Dhabi (1998), Sharjah (1999), and Dubai (2003). He has also taken part in the exhibitions organized by IRCICA in association with the Department of Tourism and Commerce Marketing in Dubai 2003, 2004 and 2005. In 2003, he participated in the calligraphy exhibition in Tokyo and joined some other calligraphers on The Days of Arabic Calligraphy in Tunisia in 1997 and 2006. He has also participated in various exhibitions in Turkey and abroad.

Osman Özçay is producing works in the styles of thuluth, jali thuluth, naskh and muhaqqaq according to the classical approach. Throughout the years his pieces of calligraphy have entered museums and special collections.

Text/Photograph © http://www.ozcay.com/

JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes.The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption.

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April 14, 2007 at 12:27 pm

Mehmed Özcay (b. 1961)

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Mehmed Özçay was born in 1961 in the Çaykara district of the province of Trabzon, in Turkey. He completed his elementary and secondary education in Gerede, subsequently graduating from the School of Theology of Atatürk University, Erzurum, in 1986. He studied naskh and thulth scripts with the calligrapher Fuat Başar, whom he met there in 1982. In 1986, he moved to İstanbul where he met M. Uğur Derman, who became his guide in calligraphy; this gave him the opportunity to broaden his horizons and deepen his appreciation for, and knowledge of, this art.

In 1986 and 1989, Özçay participated in the first two international calligraphy competitions organized by the Research Centre for Islamic History, Art and Culture (IRCICA), winning six prizes in various categories, most notably First Prize in thulth-naskh scripts. He began to copy the Holy Qur’an in 1986; completed in 1991 and first published in 1992, that work has played a key role in the development of his mastery of naskh script, and more generally in the establishment of his career as a professional calligrapher. Fine art reproductions of his copy of the Surat Ya-Sin, as well many of his panels, have also been published.

Özçay participated in many exhibitions, both in Turkey and internationally—including the Kazema Festival for Islamic Heritage (Kuwait, 1996), the Islamic World Calligraphy Festival (Tehran, 1997), Seven Ottoman Arts that have Lived Beyond 700 Years (İstanbul, 1999), the Riyadh Calligraphy Exhibition (1999), the Holy Qur’an Exhibition (Tehran, 2000), the National Calligraphy Festival (Tunis, 2001), the Tokyo Calligraphy Exhibition (2003), Salam & Calligraphy (Doha, 2003), the Sharjah International Biennal for Arabic Calligraphy (2004), the Dubai International Calligraphy Exhibitions (2004, 2005, 2006), and the Tunis Arabic Calligraphy Days (1999, 2006).

Mehmed Özçay’s first individual show was held in conjunction with his brother Osman Özçay and his sister Fatma Özçay in May 1996 at the Yıldız Palace, İstanbul. He subsequently partook in the “Özçay” exhibitions at the National Culture Foundation (İstanbul, 1998), in Doha (November 1998), Abu Dhabi (December 1998), Sharjah (1999), and Dubai (2003). He has also served as a member of the jury in a number of international calligraphy competitions.

More than 300 of Mehmed Özçay’s calligraphic panels in jali thulth, thulth, naskh, ijazah, and jali diwani scripts are currently in various collections both in Turkey and abroad.

Text/Photograph © Mehmed Özcay. http://www.ozcay.com/

JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes.The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption.

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April 14, 2007 at 12:15 pm

Hamid Aytac [Azmi, Musa; al-Amidi, Hamid] (1891-1982)

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(b Diyarbakir, 1891; d Istanbul, 10 May 1982). Turkish calligrapher. Originally called Musa Azmi, he was the grandson of Seyyid Adem, a famous calligrapher of Diyarbakir. He practised writing in Diyarbakir with his school teacher Mustafa Akif Tütenk and others, and in 1908 went to Istanbul to continue his education, first at the School of Law and then at the Fine Arts Academy. However, he was soon forced to give up his studies to earn a living. In 1910 he became a writing teacher at the Gülsen school in Istanbul, where he taught the calligrapher Halim Özyazici. He went on to direct the Rusumat press and then worked at the press of the Military Academy in Istanbul. During World War I he worked for one year in Germany, where he prepared military maps. After the war he resigned his job and began to work independently. He changed his name to Hamid Aytaç, and in the early years of the Turkish republic made labels and calling cards. As a calligrapher he practised the jali-thuluth (Turk. celi-sülüs) style with Mehmed Nazif (1846–1913), the naskh and thuluth styles with Kamil Akdic (1862–1941) and the ta`liq style with Mehmed Hulusi (1869–1940). He worked on a number of magnificent manuscripts, including Korans. He also worked at the Sisli Mosque in Istanbul and on other buildings in Istanbul and Ankara.

Text/Photograph © Macmillan Publishers Limited, publishers of The Grove Dictionary of Art.

JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes.The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption.

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April 14, 2007 at 11:18 am