Journal of Ottoman Calligraphy

Lectures & Editorials on Calligraphy

Archive for April 13th, 2007

Notable Readings: Açıklamalı Hüsn-i Hat Bibliyografyası Yazmalar – Kitaplar – Makaleler Kitaplarda Hatla İlgili Bölümler Dış Ülkelerdeki Yayınlar

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Açıklamalı Hüsn-i Hat Bibliyografyası Yazmalar – Kitaplar – Makaleler Kitaplarda Hatla İlgili Bölümler Dış Ülkelerdeki Yayınlar, Ali Haydar Bayat(Editor); Foreword by: Ekmeleddin İhsanoglu,IRCICA Yayınları (Publications); İstanbul, 2002, 14 x 20 cm., xxxıv+416 p. Turkish,ISBN 929063126

This book gives a comprehensive bibliography of manuscripts, books, articles, the parts of books related to calligraphy as well as publications that appeared on calligraphy abroad. In the foreword, Prof. Dr. Ekmeleddin İhsanoğlu underlines the importance of this art for the Islamic world and the characteristics that make it unique among other arts. He then dwells on various activities of IRCICA in the field of calligraphy since its establishment 1980, in the form of research, publications, training programs, competitions and exhibitions. He points out that the bibliographic studies of the literature on calligraphy are a major part of the studies in this field. The book also includes a brief preface by Ali Haydar Bayat and an introduction by Prof. M. Uğur Derman. The present bibliography is the revised and enlarged version of the first edition covering the years of 1888-1988 and published in 1990.

This bibliography is organized in the following way: Part I gives information on the manuscripts located in the libraries in Turkey and related to calligraphy. Part II brings together the printed works in Arab and Latin characters. Part III presents the list of books and articles, newspapers and sections on calligraphy and their subjects [….] were added at the end of the bibliographic heading. Part IV brings together the catalogues of auctions covering the subjects of calligraphy, calligraphers and materials of calligraphy. Part V brings together the works on calligraphy written outside of Turkey. Part VI presents those articles that were published outside of Turkey and that were available to the author. Part VII includes the necessary addresses for reaching the studies on calligraphy through the Internet. Part VII also contains the indices of authors, calligraphers, books and periodicals covering the articles on calligraphy, different styles and materials of calligraphy. This reference book appears as the most voluminous one of the bibliographies that were compiled till the present day since it covers almost the entire literature in Turkey on this subject.

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Written by calligrapher

April 13, 2007 at 9:23 pm

Posted in Book Reviews

A Collectors´ Vision – Ugur Derman

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Professor M. Ugur Derman’s name is synonymous with calligraphy and marbling. Though he majored in pharmacy as a profession he has rather spent most of his 71 years of life on calligraphy and book arts. More than anyone in his generation, Ugur Derman is responsible for the survival of the arts of the book in Turkey, and for the recent resurgence in their appreciation. He is a student of Necmeddin Okyay (1883-1976) but has also benefited from Macid Ayral (1891-1961), Halim Özyazci (1898-1964), and Süheyl Ünver (1898-1986). Since 1962, he has written more than 350 articles, conference proceedings, and encyclopedia items, in addition to his 13 books on the subject. He is currently teaching at both Marmara and Mimar Sinan Universities in Istanbul.

Photograph ©http://www.kitabat.org/

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April 13, 2007 at 9:08 pm

Posted in Collectors

Calligraphic Art in The Library of Congress: Ottoman Calligraphers and Their Works

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This collection presents 355 Arabic calligraphy sheets, ranging from the 9th to the 19th centuries, including examples of calligraphic art – illuminated panels, albums, and poems. In addition to individual calligraphy sheets, the presentation has essays on Ottoman and Persian calligraphic styles, an in-depth look at Qur’anic calligraphic fragments, and an essay discussing some of the Library’s notable Arabic script calligraphy sheets and illuminations.

During the late 1920s, early 1930s, and 1990s the Library of Congress acquired a large collection of Arabic script calligraphy sheets. This presentation exhibits 355 Arabic calligraphy sheets, ranging from the 9th to the 19th centuries. A majority of the calligraphy sheets were written on paper, however, a group of Qur’anic fragments from the 9th and 10th centuries were executed on parchment.

Text © The Library of Congress. http://memory.loc.gov/intldl/intldlhome.html, http://memory.loc.gov/intldl/apochtml/apochome.html

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April 13, 2007 at 8:03 pm

Calligrapher: unknown (c.1550-1600)

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Dimensions of Written Surface: Recto: 9.5 (w) x 19 (h) cm

Script: Ottoman naskh

This fragment contains on the top line the last two verses (ayat) of the last chapter (surah) of the Qur’an, entitled Surat al-Nas (Chapter of Mankind). This particular chapter extols seeking refuge in the Lord from Satan, who, like the spirits (al-jinn), whispers evil things in the hearts of people (116:5-6). The verses at the top of the folio are separated by two ayah markers shaped like gold disks with five blue dots on their peripheries.

Immediately below the last verse of the Qur’an appears a prayer in five lines praising God, the Prophet Muhammad, and all Prophets (or messengers, al-mursilin) of Islam. The continuation of this terminal du’a (or formulaic prayer) continues in illuminated bands on the folio’s verso (see 1-85-154.74 V and James 1992b: 178-9, cat. no. 43). The prayer is beautifully calligraphed in large Ottoman naskh in alternating gold and blue ink.

This prayer is said upon completion of the Qur’an (al-du’a ba’d khatim al-Qur’an), in which God is praised as the all-hearing (al-sami’) and the all-knowing (al-‘alim). It continues the initial, non-illuminated five-line prayer on the folio’s recto (1-85-154.74 R) and serves as an appropriate closing to the Holy Book. In some cases, illuminated terminal prayers in rectangular bands such as this one precede a four-page treatise on how to practice divination (fal) using the letters of the Qur’an (see 1-84.154.42 R).

Although only one illuminated folio remains, it originally would have created a double-page illuminated du’a. This layout is typical of Safavid Persian Qur’ans from the second half of the 16th century (see James 1992b: 178-9, cat. no. 43), as well as Ottoman Turkish Qur’ans from the same period. For instance, a similar prayer appears immediately at the end of an Ottoman Turkish Qur’an dated 980/1573, now held in the Keir Collection in London, England (VII.49; Robinson 1976, 294). Due to similarities in script (in which three lines of text in gold alternate with a line in white ink), composition, and illumination, the prayer fragment here probably dates from the second half of the 16th century as well.

Photograph ©Abdel Kader Haidara,Bibliotheque Mamma Haidara de Manuscrits et la Documentation. Siège: Tombouctou BP 71 RPp.du Mali.
JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes.The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption.

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April 13, 2007 at 7:45 pm

Abdulvehhap Zihni Efendi

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Abdulvehhap Zihni, dated A.H.1264 (C.E.1847) Mevlawi crown, 23×17.5 cm.

Photograph © Macka Mezat, Istanbul

JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes.The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption.

Written by calligrapher

April 13, 2007 at 7:19 pm

Yahya Sufi [b.? -d.1477]

Tile panel by Yahya Sufi of celi sülüs kufi script, Fatih Cami (Mosque) Istanbul.

Photograph ©HAT SAN’ATI Tarihçe, Malzeme ve Örnekler, Istanbul. http://ismek.ibb.gov.tr/portal/yayinlarimiz.asp

JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes.The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption.

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April 13, 2007 at 7:07 pm

Yahya Sufi (d.1477)

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Tile panel by Yahya Sufi of celi sülüs kufi script, Fatih Cami (Mosque) Istanbul.

Photograph ©HAT SAN’ATI Tarihçe, Malzeme ve Örnekler, Istanbul. http://ismek.ibb.gov.tr/portal/yayinlarimiz.asp

JOC provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes.The written permission of the copyright owners and/or holders of other rights (such as publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemption.

Written by calligrapher

April 13, 2007 at 7:07 pm